Hoe zorg je dat jouw verhaal impact heeft?

Dat is een goede vraag.

 

Het zou zo fijn zijn als je publiek jouw idee net zo belangrijk vind als jij. Dat zij zich net zo druk maken over de uitkomst van het project als jij. Dat ze in meteen in actie komen nadat de laatste woorden van de presentatie je lippen hebben verlaten. Dat zou wat zijn.

 

taraDaarom ben ik zo blij dat Tara Phillips, Corporate & TEDx speaker coach haar kennis deelt ons de maverick community.

In dit gastblog van Tara geeft ze voorbeelden over hoe zij leiders heeft geholpen om impact te maken door authentiek te zijn.

Je zal zien dat dat voor elke leider weer heel iets anders betekende.

Je zal zien dat je helemaal niet de nieuwe Steve Jobs hoeft te zijn om je publiek weg te blazen, in te pakken om mee te nemen.

Hoe maak jij jouw verhaal krachtig? Deze leiders deden het zo…

-Peter Clausman, School of Mavericks

 

“Be yourself. Everyone else is taken”

 

Authenticity. Marketers word of choice at the moment. In fact, the word ‘authentic’ is being bandied about so much lately I wouldn’t be surprised if you’ve got ‘authentic fatigue’.

 

So what’s it all about? And what exactly does it mean anyway? In it’s simplest term “Not false or copied. Genuine. Real”

 

How does that translate when on stage? For me, that doesn’t mean standing up unprepared, untrained, “warts and all” as some cynics would suggest. It means being your best self.

 

It means harnessing your speaking strengths. Do you have a compelling story to tell? Do you have a ‘way with words’? Or perhaps a winning smile? Is your stance strong and powerful?   Do you have killer data that will stun the audience? Can you clearly articulate the problem and offer a workable solution? Do you believe so strongly in your cause that people are inspired by your conviction?

 

be-yourselfI believe that everyone has strong points that can be highlighted and worked on. This gives incredible confidence to the presenter as they are utilising innate skills. And a confident speaker shines so much brighter on stage.

 

But it also means addressing things that could potentially hinder your message landing.

 

You don’t have to be Steve Jobs #2

I recently worked with a guy who was new in the post of CEO after a challenging merger. This was to be his first talk as CEO so it had to be good. It was obvious he cared; he was smart and he had a plan. He was determined to bring the company together and have the employees thrive. But his dead-pan demeanour and inexpressive tone might have disguised this. We could have spent hours trying to make a Steve Jobs out of him or we could have addressed ‘the elephant in the room’. We went for the latter with some gentle humour and appreciation of the situation.

 

“I’m excited to be here. It may not be obvious, but this is about excited as I get. For those of you that don’t know me, I used to fly helicopters and believe me – the last thing you want is the pilot getting all jumpy and excited as he’s coming in to land in a tight spot at night.   But I am excited and that is because I love challenges. And the … Project is about as big a challenge as they come in this industry. Getting 400+ people across 40 countries working together on various activities is no small feat. And doing it well is even harder.”  

 

Of course he aced it. He was authentic. It’s really important that the person on stage is the same person you would meet after in the bar. The audience have an incredibly fine-tuned bulls**t radar.

 

Want to install trust? Don’t just recite your script…

If as a leader you want to instil trust, you must be authentic.

 

I recently worked with a Senior Vice President that had just cut a significant amount of jobs. It was clear that he found the redundancies upsetting and it was not a task he has taken lightly. This was reflected well in his script. But, at the rehearsal he rushed through the speech sounding strident and distant. He was not connecting with the emotion of the talk so there was no way the audience were going to. His staff would have perceived him as cold as there was no correlation between the words and their delivery. So I encouraged him to feel the words he was saying, to imagine he was having a conversation (rather than giving a speech) and to bring in vocal variety.

 

Sometimes being genuine takes some attention 😉

 

And other times it takes guts.

 

Crying is okay

Another client of mine had to have a near-death experience to have the courage to leave the well paid job that she hated to start her own company empowering women to make braver career choices. She was invited to talk to an esteemed group at an International Women’s Day conference.

Her first draft was competent. She encouraged the audience to identifying their dreams and goals, to listen to their limiting & empowering beliefs – all good solid stuff but it missed a spark; something that was going to set her apart and make her memorable.

Seeing as she had so clearly ‘walked-the-walk’ I invited her to share her personal story.

At first it was an outright ‘no’. It would look egotistical or she might cry and look ‘weak’. I said that everyone needs a role model; a demonstration that is can be done and this is a perfect example. In the end she agreed and told a brave, heart-warming story that did induce tears but in the eyes of many inspired women who were soon to be clients!

Tara Phillips – Corporate & TEDx Speaker coach, Cause & Affect Speeches

Wil je meer impact met jouw verhaal? Kom in actie!

Wil je werk maken van jouw impact? Binnenkort geven Tara en ik de Masterclass Impactful Presenting. Doe mee en leer hoe jij gemakkelijk meer draagvlak kan creëren. Kijk hier hoe je mee kan doen met de Masterclass van Tara.

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